Setup a computer

There are multiple ways to setup a computer for Learning Path creation.

Three tools are mandatory:

  • A text editor to create and modify markdown files
  • Hugo static site generator to review content
  • Git to access the repository and submit contributions

Fork the repository

You will need a GitHub account to continue. Sign up for a new account or use your existing account.

No matter which computer option you choose, the first step is to fork the GitHub repository into your own GitHub account.

  1. Go to the repository in GitHub
  2. Click Fork in the top right area.
  3. Follow the prompts to create a new fork. This provides your own copy for you to make changes without impacting the main repository.

Set up a development machine

Three possible ways to setup a development machine are covered below.

Select one that works for you. Please share other ways that work for you

Option 1: Set up a local computer

The first option is to install the required tools on your local computer.

  1. Install a text editor

Any text editor can be used to create and modify the project markdown files. Many developers use Visual Studio Code , but any text editor can be used.

If you already have a text editor installed go to the next step.

  1. Install Git

Install Git using the documentation for your operating system.

  1. Clone the project repository

Clone your fork of the repository to your local machine (substitute your github account name in the command below). You can copy the path by visiting your fork in GitHub and clicking the Code button.

    

        
        
            git clone https://github.com/<your-github-account-name>/arm-learning-paths
        
    

You now have a local copy of the repository on your computer.

  1. Install Hugo

Install Hugo so you can see how your changes look before submitting them for review.

This enables you to run a local web server and see the content just how it will appear when published.

The easiest way to download Hugo on Linux (Debian/Ubuntu) is using the package manager.

    

        
        
            sudo apt install hugo
        
    

You can also download Hugo for other operating systems from the releases page . Hugo works on all major operating systems and architectures.

Recent versions of Hugo between v0.81.0 to v0.111.3 will work.

For even more ways to install Hugo check the documentation .

Check Hugo is installed correctly and check the version by running this command:

    

        
        
            hugo version
        
    

Navigate into the arm-learning-paths folder and run hugo to launch a development version of website on your machine.

    

        
        
            cd arm-learning-paths
hugo server
        
    

Hugo server will print a message to connect to port 1313

    

        
        Web Server is available at //localhost:1313/ (bind address 127.0.0.1)

        
    

Open a browser and go to http://localhost:1313

You are now ready to start developing content. The content creation process consists of editing the markdown files for Learning Paths and viewing the changes on your computer using Hugo.

Option 2: Set up Gitpod

The second option is to use Gitpod as a development environment.

Gitpod is a cloud development environment (CDE) which makes it easy to create software from any computer.

Instead of installing tools on your local computer, you can create and modify content directly in Gitpod. The repository is configured to initialize a Gitpod instance with all tools/software you need to start contributing right away.

Visit your fork of the GitHub project in your browser.

Install the Gitpod Chrome Extension which installs a Gitpod button in your GitHub projects.

If you do not want install the browser extension, you can also prefix the URL for your fork of the GitHub project with gitpod.io/# to open the project in Gitpod.

Either way, open the repository in Gitpod. The URL looks like this: https://gitpod.io/#github.com/ArmDeveloperEcosystem/arm-learning-paths (replace with the path to your fork).

You can use your GitHub credentials, or select another authentication method to login to Gitpod and use the Free plan which offers 500 credits (about 50 hours) per month.

A new project will open in the browser. This is VS Code with the project loaded in your browser.

All the required tools are installed automatically by Gitpod during the environment setup.

A view of the generated site is also opened automatically. The website view is not easy to see because it’s in a sub-window of VS Code.

To move the website view into another browser tab, click on the top right corner. The tooltip for this click is “open in browser”.

This gives you a private version of the content in a new tab to review.

You are now ready to edit markdown files and view the results in the Gitpod environment.

Option 3: Set up a remote Linux server

The third option for Learning Path development is to use a remote Linux server, such as an AWS EC2 instance or other cloud virtual machine. The remote Linux server can also be on your local network.

Find the IP address or DNS name of the remote server and make sure you can SSH to the computer.

Install the same tools as you would on the local computer setup above:

  • Text editor
  • Git
  • Hugo

To access the Hugo server on the remote machine, use ssh port forwarding (use port 1313):

    

        
        
            ssh -L 1313:localhost:1313 user@ip-address
        
    

Clone your fork of the repository to the remote Linux server (substitute your github account name in the command below):

    

        
        
            git clone https://github.com/<your-github-account-name>/arm-learning-paths
        
    

There are a number of good options for text editors if you don’t have a full Linux desktop available on the remote server.

To use Visual Studio Code in the browser on your remote Linux server check the install information for OpenVSCode Server and VS Code Tunnels

Navigate into the arm-learning-paths folder and run hugo to launch a development version of website on your machine.

    

        
        
            cd arm-learning-paths
hugo server
        
    

Hugo server will print a message to connect to port 1313

    

        
        Web Server is available at //localhost:1313/ (bind address 127.0.0.1)

        
    

Open a browser and go to http://localhost:1313

You are now ready to edit markdown files and view the results on the Hugo server.

When you run hugo server you will not see the search box on the home page. You don’t need to do anything for the search feature to find your content, but you may want to enable the search box and test it during your development.

The search feature requires search index data to be created. If the data is available, the search box will appear on the home page.

To see the search box run the following commands before you run hugo server as described above:

    

        
        
            hugo
pagefind --site "public" --output-subdir ../static/pagefind
        
    

Refer to the script hugo-server.sh at the top of the repository. If you have pagefind installed on your computer you can run the script to create the search index and start the server.

There are also executables for Pagefind in the bin/ directory.

Pagefind executableOS
bin/pagefindLinux (x86)
bin/pagefind.aarch64Linux (aarch64)
bin/pagefind.arm64macOS (Apple Silicon)
bin/pagefind.exeWindows (x86)

For example, if you are working on Arm Linux you generate the search index using:

    

        
        
            bin/pagefind.aarch64 --site "public" --output-subdir ../static/pagefind
        
    
Note

The search index does not automatically update as you enter content. You can run hugo and pagefind again and restart hugo server to update the search index with your current content.

The next section will cover how to create and format Learning Paths.

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